[Epub] ➛ Sugarbread ➜ Balli Kaur Jaswal – Ivogue.co.uk


10 thoughts on “Sugarbread

  1. says:

    There is nothingI want well, there s a lot, but for brevity s sake than art here to succeed We re a nation of multitudes our stories span centuries and countries and continents Yet for some reason, we re always focusing on the same topics in literature the nation s sterility this is so lazy that I m not going to get into it We always want to discuss gay rights yet we never go past descriptions of gratuitous coupling and my husband cheated on me because he s closeted We re alw There is nothingI want well, there s a lot, but for brevity s sake than art here to succeed We re a nation of multitudes our stories span centuries and countries and continents Yet for some reason, we re always focusing on the same topics in literature the nation s sterility this is so lazy that I m not going to get into it We always want to discuss gay rights yet we never go past descriptions of gratuitous coupling and my husband cheated on me because he s closeted We re always lambasting the government yet hardly offering solutions Was this novel at first Most likely revolutionary even Now it s trite Finally,finally , though, here is a story that hardly does any of that I admit, at first, I was skeptical Forced references to Singapore pepper the first few pages my mother spoke Singlish, this is Singapore, etc , which I found odd I am in Singapore, I don t need the obvious reminder This is why I docked perhaps half a point it s not the reminders that I a...


  2. says:

    This is such a great local young adult novel, i m really surprised it hasn t been marketed as such Sensitively written and universally appealing without compromising on the particularities of growing up as part of a tiny, sometimes close minded minority community in Singapore, Sugarbread tells the story of Pin and her family with compulsion, sincerity and grace Jaswal does a superb job of writing a complex young character with agency, who s developing and learning as her life unfolds I m a bi This is such a great local young adult novel, i m really surprised it hasn t been marketed as such Sensitively written and universally appealing without compromising on the particularities of growing up as part of a tiny, sometimes close minded minority community in Singapore, Sugarbread tells the story of Pin and her family with compulsion, sincerity and grace Jaswal does a superb job of writing a complex young character with agency, who s developing and learning as her life unfolds I m a bit of a sucker for stories that tie emotions to food and its preparations, and this one certainly delivered on that front as well Sugarbread, like Inheritance before it, confronts painful and difficult aspects of our existenc...


  3. says:

    About 3.5 stars, but not quite 4 Much of this has to do with the typical narrative structure of this book This is about ten year old Pin going on eleven growing up Sikh in late 80s, early 90s multicultural Singapore It s a coming of age tale that has at its heart family secrets, relationships between women, sexism, religion, tradition vs modernity, and the mea...


  4. says:

    In addition to being a compelling and empathetic portrayal of a young Punjabi Sikh girl growing up in Singapore in the 1990s, Sugarbread is also a celebration of women, and it doesn t shy away from the complicated relationships between them Each of the main female characters Pin, her mother Jini, and her grandmother Kulwant Nani ji are evoked with such affection that it s hard to believe after finishing the book that they are fictional Jaswal does not shy away from showing us how flawed and In addition to being a compelling and empathetic portrayal of a young Punjabi Sikh girl growing up in Singapore in the 1990s, Sugarbread is also a celebration of women, and it doesn t shy away from the complicated relationships between them Each of the main female characters Pin, her mother Jini, and her grandmother Kulwant Nani ji are evoked with such affection that it s hard to believe after finishing the book that they are fictional Jaswal does not shy away from showing us how flawed and human they are, and the small and not so small tragedies that they suffer through, as well as the triumphs that make the reader let out woots of joy.All of this, plus an examination of Singapore s endemic racism, especially toward its South Asian community Pin has to brook taunts by Bus Uncle, an old man who collects money from the students on the school bus and attempts, and fails, to keep order , as well as vile comments from classmate Abigail Goh Pin s outrage and how...


  5. says:

    This novel is sensitively written, and raises important issues subtly racism and racialization religiosity and its relation to identity patriarchal values class and the intersection of Christianity and capitalism in the wonderful speech about spiritual bank accounts All the characters have depth and complexity and the two layers of the narrative the experiences of Pin and of her mother Jini are skilfully blended There are some beautiful descriptive passages, and I like the way in whi This novel is sensitively written, and raises important issues subtly racism and racialization religiosity and its relation to identity patriarchal values class and the intersection of Christianity and capitalism in the wonderful speech about spiritual bank accounts All the characters have depth and complexity and the two layers of the narrative the experiences of Pin and of her mother Jini are skilfully blended There are some beautiful descriptive passages, and I like the way in which metaphors are used sparingly, but to good effect Philip Holden, editor of Writing Singapore and Epigram Books Fi...


  6. says:

    This is a beautifully told story about family, secrets, and cultural clashes Pin is a narrator who is funny, sweet, honest, and delightful My favourite part about this book is how she looks for her mother s...


  7. says:

    Jaswal s book is an important self reflection of the Punjabi community in Singapore The events in her book may have taken place in the late 1960s and early 1990s yet some of the situations in the book would not be entirely anachronistic today Ditto Pin s encounters with racism I like how Jaswal s fem...


  8. says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here It was Singapore and it was July The early morning sun glowed orange and rose between high buildings stream of light poured through the still branches of trees and heat rose from the pavement 3But Ma liked to say that gambling was as useless and praying when you were in trouble 12Ma ushered me out of the lanes, out of the drowning sounds, the yellowish lighting, the raw smell of blood Outside, th...


  9. says:

    I read this in anticipation of Jaswal s soon to be released Erotic Stories by Punjabi Widows This is a charming story about food, family and childhood with darker underlying themes such as discrimination, sexism and religious hypocrisy Pin s encounters with racism are framed in a Singapore context with old fashioned slurs and general ignorance about her community from her peers however the story felt personal to me as an Asian woman who grew up in Britain in the 80s and 90s Definitely a I read this in anticipation of Jaswal s soon to be released Erotic Stories by Punjabi Widows This is a charming story about food, family and childhood with darker underlying themes such as discrimination, sexism and religious hypocrisy Pin s encounters with racism are framed in a Singapore context with old fashioned slurs and general ignorance about her community from her peers however the stor...


  10. says:

    Singapore Australian writer Balli Kaur Jaswal tells a charming story about a young Sikh girl growing up in Singapore Pin is something of an outsider, an oddity at her Christian primary school and rejected by the local boys that she wants to play football with.Pin is close with her mother and goes with her to the markets and to temple, but senses that something is not entirely right When her ailing Nana ji comes to live her last days with them, the secrets in her mother s background gradually b Singapore Australian writer Balli Kaur Jaswal tells a charming story about a young Sikh girl growing up in Sin...


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Sugarbread Finalist For The 2015 Epigram Books Fiction PrizeShortlisted For The 2017 Singapore Book Award For FictionPin Must Not Become Like Her Mother, But Nobody Will Tell Her Why She Seeks Clues In Ma S Cooking When She S Not Fighting Other Battles Being A Bursary Girl At An Elite School And Facing Racial Taunts From The Bus Uncle Then Her Meddlesome Grandmother Moves In, Installing A Portrait Of A Watchful Sikh Guru And A New Set Of House Rules Old Secrets Begin To Surface But Can Pin Handle Learning The Truth

  • Paperback
  • 280 pages
  • Sugarbread
  • Balli Kaur Jaswal
  • English
  • 24 November 2018

About the Author: Balli Kaur Jaswal

Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Sugarbread book, this is one of the most wanted Balli Kaur Jaswal author readers around the world.